SSIS Ratings for High School Students with Severe Disabilities: An Analysis

We present findings from an analysis of parent and teacher ratings on the Social Skills Improvement System (SSIS) for 134 high school students with severe disabilities. The purpose of this study is to understand parent and teacher ratings of social skills and problem behavior, the characteristics of students, teachers, and parents that predict ratings, and respondent alignment or divergence. Attendees will (a) understand how teachers and parents rate the social skills and problem behavior of high school students with severe disabilities, (b) identify the characteristics of students, teachers, and parents that are predictive of those ratings, (c) identify the extent to which teacher and parent ratings align or diverge, and (c) demonstrate understanding of the implications of these results for practitioners and researchers. An understanding of social skills and problem behavior profiles of youth with severe disabilities has significant implications for practitioners, parents, and researchers. For researchers, knowledge of the social and behavioral profile of youth with severe disabilities can more effectively guide the development of interventions. Practitioners and parents can also benefit from this information when programming and planning interventions for their children and students. While the SSIS was normed with samples that included individuals with severe disabilities and is often used by practitioners and researchers, the SSIS has not yet been examined in a sample comprised solely of youth with severe disabilities. Social skills and problem behavior scores were collected using the Social Skills Improvement Scale (SSIS) for a sample of 134 high school students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, recruited from 22 high school students in 2 states.