Preparing Future Leaders: Promoting Prosocial Behaviors and Preventing Challenging Behaviors with Preschoolers

The purpose of this presentation is to teach practitioners in the field of early childhood how to create meaningful and engaging learning environments using Positive Behavioral Supports. Our children are the future leaders and teaching Positive Behavior Supports as early as preschool will not only benefit them, but also society as they will be better prepared to live independent successful lives. Practitioners will learn how to effectively implement individual applications of Positive Behavior Supports by using a team approach to target specific student behaviors using Functional Behavioral Assessment and how to appropriately implement the individualized plans with caregivers and other professionals. The purpose of this presentation is to teach practitioners in the field of early childhood how to create meaningful and engaging learning environments that (1) build positive relationships, (2) follow schedules and routines, (3) define and teach behavioral expectations, and (4) plan for effective transitions throughout the school day. Disruptive behavior is the single greatest challenge that preschool teachers face on a daily basis. Effective early childhood education programs are consistent, predictable, and positive places. In effective preschools, there is a common vision, language, and set of experiences for all members of the community. After participation in this presentation practitioners will be able to implement effective positive behavior support strategies in the their classrooms that include: (1) identify the skill(s) they want to teach, (2) teach social skills concept during large and small group activities and provide individualized instruction for children who need it, (3) give children opportunities to practice through role play, prompting children through an interaction (scaffolding), and embedding instruction, (4) model the behaviors in every day interactions, (5) reinforce the behavior in context through the use positive descriptive feedback to comment on children engaging in the behavior, and (6) involve children in reflecting on the skills individually or in a group. Participants will also gain knowledge in data collection and will be presented with a variety of examples of behavioral and data collection strategies and documentation sheets that they can implement in their classrooms to improve their practice.

Kathleen O’Hara, Delilah Krasch, Conrad Oh Young, Maryssa Kucskar