Pathways TO Employment and OUT of Poverty

This session will successful highlight approaches to support people with disabilities who are unemployed/underemployed and poor. Identifying and utilizing strategies to equip people with financial knowledge is a critical first step to changing financial behavior and improving financial stability — approaches that are most effective when people are engaged in a job search, collecting a first paycheck, and/or transitioning from school to college or work. After this sessions, participants will be able to: 1. Identify issues and learn about why focusing on economic advancement is important (i.e., not only focusing on employment 2. Build capacity of service providers, people with disabilities, and families to implement economic advancement strategies that remove barriers that keep people with disabilities from getting and keeping jobs. 3. Identify resources and strategies to assist in educating job seekers and the people who support them so that they can get support to become employed, retain employment, and become financially secure. This session will successful highlight approaches to support people with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed and poor. Identifying and utilizing strategies to equip people with financial knowledge is a critical first step to changing financial behavior and improving financial stability. The best time to teach an individual about their money is at a point in time when it’s needed, such as during a job search, collecting a first paycheck, and/or transitioning from school to college or work. There exists, in each community, a robust menu of activities to improve the financial stability of low-income individuals, with and without disabilities. This session will provide an overview of the role of service providers, parents, supports, and self-advocates is to identify, introduce and support efforts to integrate financial stability strategies into disability services and improve collaboration between the disability and financial stability communities to improve the financial health of Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, other disabilities, their families and staff, and other key stakeholders.

Elizabeth Jennings, Rebecca Salon